Have a [Safe] Blast! Fireworks Tips

28 Jun

One of my fondest childhood memories centers around older cousins chasing me through the fields of my grandparents’ farm with a lit sparkler.

It’s a wonder I survived!

As a TV reporter in Arkansas, I covered at least a half-dozen serious injuries to children as a result of fireworks use.  The most vivid: Halloween night, a tween boy blew off a hand launching a bottle rocket.

With Fourth of July festivities just days away, I thought I’d put on my über-Mommy knickers and bring you these tips from the Consumer Product Safety Commission:

  • Do not allow young children to play with fire-works under any circumstances.  Sparklers, considered by many to be the ideal “safe” firework for the young, burn at very high temperatures and can easily ignite clothing.  Children cannot understand the danger involved with fireworks and may not act appropriately in case of emergency.
  • Older children should be permitted to use fireworks only under close adult supervision.  Do not allow any running or horseplay.
  • Set off fireworks outdoors in a clear area, away from houses, dry leaves, or grass and other flammable materials.
  • Keep a bucket of water nearby for emergencies and for pouring on fireworks that fail to ignite or explode.
  • Do not try to relight or handle malfunctioning fireworks.  Soak them with water and throw them away.
  • Be sure other people are out of range before lighting fireworks.
  • Never light fireworks in a container, especially a glass or metal container.
  • Keep unused fireworks away from firing areas.
  • Store fireworks in a cool, dry place.
  • Check instructions for special storage directions.
  • Observe local laws.
  • Never have any portion of your body directly over a firework while lighting.
  • Do not experiment with homemade fireworks.

According to CPSC estimates, last year some 8,600 people were treated in hospital emergency rooms for injuries associated with fireworks.  More than half of the injuries were burns, and most of the injuries involved the head (including face, eyes, and ears) hands, fingers, and legs.  Children and young adults under the age of 20 years old accounted for more than half of the estimated injuries.  Fireworks should be used only with extreme caution.  Older children should be closely supervised, and younger children should not be allowed to play with fireworks, including sparklers.

Oh, yeah, and have a very Happy Fourth of July!

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2 Responses to “Have a [Safe] Blast! Fireworks Tips”

  1. Lori June 28, 2011 at 5:33 pm #

    Thank you for posting these great tips, Lisa! I remember getting scoffed at by a family member one summer, for not allowing my 2 year old daughter to have a sparkler. I have personally known several people whose children have sustained minor to moderate burns from sparklers.

  2. Lisa June 29, 2011 at 12:23 pm #

    Lori:

    Sparklers burn at terrifying temperatures–anywhere from 1800-2200 degrees (hot enough to melt certain metals!). You were very wise to decline.

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